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William Meikle Bibliography Examples

PRE-2011 SMALL PRESS SALES


Ghostwriter Publications Chapbooks ( v. rare )
  • Carnacki: The New Investigations boxset DEC 2009
    • The Blooded Iklwa
    • The Larkhill Barrow
    • The Sisters of Mercy
  • The Castle of Blood / JUL 2009 / The Castle of Blood, Double or Nothing
  • When the Stars Are Right / JUL 2009 / When the Stars are Right, Aboard The Vordlak
  • Seraphim / JUL 2009 / Seraphim, Morlocks, Flickers
  • The Watcher in the Dunes / JUL 2009 / The Watcher in the Dunes, The Elixir of Life, Sandy Says So
  • Ghost Writer / SEP 2009 / Ghost Writer, A Spill of Vitriol
  • Truth Decay / OCT 2009 / Truth Decay
  • Cold as Death / OCT 2009 / Cold as Death
  • Brotherhood of the Thorns / OCT 2009 / Brotherhood of the Thorns
  • Unstrung / NOV 2009 / Unstrung
  • The Chamber of Tiamat / NOV 2009 / The Chamber of Tiamat
  • Samurai / NOV 2009 / Samurai
  • William Meikle Creature / DEC 2009 / The Creeping Kelp, Generators
  • Island Life Digest Sampler / FEB 2010 / Island Life Digest
  • King Crab vs Giant Scorpion / APR 2010 / King Crab vs Giant Scorpion (with Neil Jackson)
  • Abominable / JUN 2010 Abominable
  • The Haunting of Esther Cox / JUL 2010 The Haunting of Esther Cox
  • The Saxon / OCT 2010 The Saxon
  • Fear Liath Mor / NOV 2010 / Fear Liath Mor
Other Small Press Sales (audio)
  • Celtic Myth Podshow / Jun 2008 / The Last Silkie / UK
  • Celtic Myth Podshow / Mar 2009 / One Spring Eve / UK
  • Tell You A Tale / 2002 / Just a Par to Win / UK
  • Tell You A Tale / 2002 / The Last Day of Summer / UK
  • Tell You A Tale / 2002 / At The Beach / UK
  • VIP ON AIR / 2002 / Dancers / UK
  • VIP ON AIR / 2002 / The Strange Case of Dr MacIntyre / UK
  • VIP ON AIR / 2002 / Just a Par to Win / UK
  • Well Told Tales / 2007 / The Last Day of Summer / US
  • Well Told Tales / Jun 2008 / It�ll be a Long Hot Summer / US
Other Small Press Sales
  • A Riot of Emotions / #5 / / Some drawings, made by moonlight / UK
  • Ballista / #4, / March 2008 / A Picture of Hitler / UK
  • Banshee, The / #7 / April 1994 / One spring eve/ UK
  • Bats and Red Velvet / #12 Vol.2(2) / February 1995 / Genesis � First Book of the Dark/ UK
  • Bats and Red Velvet / #13 Vol.2(3) / May 1995 / Tenets � the Second Book of the Dark UK
  • Bats and Red Velvet / #14 Vol.2(4) / August 1995 / Temple � the Third Book of the Dark / UK
  • Bats and Red Velvet / #15 Vol.2(5) / December 1995 / Tribulations � the Fourth Book of the Dark UK
  • Bats and Red Velvet / #16 Vol.2(6) / March 1996 / Lamentations � the Fifth Book of the Dark UK
  • Bats and Red Velvet / #17 Vol.2(7) / May 1996 / Revelations � the Sixth Book of the Dark / UK
  • Beyond Centauri / #20/ 2008/ The Last Day of Summer / US
  • Black Tears / #2 / 1993 / Living off the fat off the land/ UK
  • Black Tears / #3 / 1994 / Hot Line / UK
  • Black Tears / #4 / 1994 / The Divine Wind / UK
  • Black Tears / #8 / 1995 / Revenge / UK
  • Dread / #9 / Fall 1999 / The flute and the glen / USA
  • Dreams from the Stranger�s Caf� #1 / Winter 1993 / Precious / UK
  • Dreams from the Stranger�s Caf� #2 / Spring 1994 / When the stars are right/ UK
  • Dreams from the Stranger�s Caf� #3 / Summer 1994 / Blind / / UK
  • Dreams from the Stranger�s Caf� #4 / Spring 1995 / Abroad the Vordlak / UK
  • Eulogy / #8 / / The Old Mother / USA
  • Fiction Furnace / #1(3) / Summer 1993 / Last Day of Summer / UK
  • Fiction Furnace / #1(4) / Winter 1993/94 / Loathsome Slime / UK
  • Flickers �n� Frames magazine #22 / Autumn 1994 / The Worst sound / UK
  • Flickers �n� Frames magazine #24-2 / Summer 1995 / Temper Tantrum / UK
  • Flickers �n� Frames magazine #26 / Autumn 1996 / The Curse of the campfire / UK
  • Fools Motley / / 2003 / At the Trial of the Loathesome Slime / UK
  • Footsteps � Tales of quiet horror #1 / October 1995 / The Sweller in the dress hold / UK
  • Footsteps � Tales of quiet horror #2 / March 1996 / Lucidity / UK
  • Footsteps � Tales of quiet horror #3 / October 1996 / Flickers / UK
  • Gibbering madness / No. 3 / / The Blood is the Life / UK
  • Graveyard Rendevous / 2009 / The Queue / UK
  • Grotesque � Simply grotesque fiction #2 / 1993 / Crossroads / UK
  • Grotesque � Simply grotesque fiction #5 / 1994 / The Wish / UK
  • Grotesque � Simply grotesque fiction #7 / 1995 / The Watcher in the Dunes / UK
  • Grotesque � Simply grotesque fiction #9 / 1995 / 12.30 a.m. Viewer�s Choice (rpt) / UK
  • Inflated Graveworm, The #21 / Nov/Dec 2002 / A Siren�s Song/ USA
  • Masque / #1 / 1996 / Drowning / UK
  • Masque / #2 / 1996 / The World of Illusion / UK
  • Masque / #3 / 1997 / Sandy Says So/ UK
  • Mentally penetrated / #5 / 1997 / Bridges / / UK
  • Midnight in hell / Vol.3(1) / September 1994 / A Siren�s Song/ UK
  • Night Dreams / #3 / November 1995 / There�s Always a Catch / UK
  • Orion / #3 / 1993 / Morlocks / UK
  • Outer Darkness / #21 / / Seraphim / USA
  • Phantasy Province / #3 / 1992 / The Old Mother/ UK
  • Saccade / #7 / 1996 / Leisure Time / UK
  • Sierra Heaven / #1 / Spring 1996 / In the Coils of the Serpent / UK
  • Starfleet Mysteries / October 1993 / Going home / USA
  • Startling Space Stories / #1, / Jan 2008 / Aboard The Vordlak/ UK
  • Threads / #1 / October 1993 / The colour from the deep / UK
  • Threads Summer Special No.1 1994 / To the sea again / UK
  • Threads / #5 / October 1994 / Joining with the One / UK
  • Threads / #7 / Spring 1995 / It�ll be a long hot summer / UK
  • (UN(REAL)ITY) / #4 / fall 1993 / The copycat murders/ USA
  • Universe Pathways / Spring 2008 / The World of Illusion / Greece
  • Urges / #1 / Summer 1995 / Creature feature/ UK
  • Urges / #2 / March 1996 / The hand of fate / UK
  • Urges / #3 / October 1996 / Watching / UK
  • Vampire�s Crypt / No. 12 / Fall 1995 / Genesis � the First Book of the dark / USA
  • Velvet Vampyre, the / #21 / 1993 / Seraphim / UK
  • Velvet Vampyre, the / #22 / 1993 / Morning sickness / UK
  • Velvet Vampyre, the / #25 / Summer 1994 / Bridges/ UK
  • Wheel, The / #11 / Summer 2007 / The Old Mother/ USA
  • Whispers and Shouts / Vol.1(3) / March 1994 / The Worst Sound/ USA
  • Whispers and Shouts / Vol.1(4) / Summer 1994 / At the trial of the loathsome slime / USA
  • Xenos / #13 / June 1992 / An early frost / UK
  • Xenos / #16 / December 1992 / Ghost writer/ UK
  • Xenos / #19 / June 1993 / Total quality reproduction / UK
  • Xenos / #21 / October 1993 / Tannis / / UK
  • Xenos / #29 / February 1995 / Generations / UK
  • Zone, The / No.4 / summer 1996 / The End of the World as we know it / UK

Written by William Meikle
2017, 189 pages, Fiction
Released on December 9th, 2017

My initial reaction to William Meikle’s The Ghost Club: Newly Found Tales of Victorian Terror was not a particularly favourable one, however, once I figured out exactly what was really going on, I quickly lapped it up. At first glance it looks like a collection of old ghost stories written in the Victorian era, of which there are many, and is cobbled together by a hammy narrator interconnecting the stories. I have a feeling this was exactly what William Meikle wanted the unsuspecting reader to think.

When I looked down the impressive list of contributors, many all-time greats are featured, including Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, Leo Tolstoy, Bram Stoker, Mark Twain, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Jules Verne, Arthur Conan Doyle and others, bringing the total to fourteen. After an initial browse, I then presumed most of the stories would be copyright free and easy to obtain on Kindle and that this anthology would just be a waste of my hard-earned cash. How wrong I was.

Over the years I’ve read a fair bit of Robert Louis Stevenson and particularly enjoyed some of his shorter fiction, such as the supernatural classic ‘The Bottle Imp’, and so I started with his entry ‘Wee Davie Makes a Friend’, which I had, rather surprisingly, never heard of and could find no trace of on Google. That’s the fun of it, you’ll find no trace of any of the fourteen of the featured tales on any search engine, as they are all new creations of William Meikle written in the style of these fourteen legendary authors. A pretty neat idea which is executed beautifully.

I’m by no means an expert on all the authors Meikle has fun toying with but have read enough Victorian-era ghost stories to appreciate the difficulty in producing such authentic recreations. The diversity of styles is particularly impressive; for instance, the 100% accurate reimagining of Bram Stoker is a real beauty and a personal favourite. American audiences are more certainly going to chuckle at the authors astute take on Mark Twain. On a few occasions I found myself recalling and comparing authentic works by the authors, and William Meikle’s versions hold up very well against them. Many who try this book will believe they are reading the real thing and mimicry aside, this is a high-quality collection of ghost stories and the supernatural whoever the author is or is not.

If you aren’t familiar with Tolstoy, Henry Rider Haggard and the others then you are unlikely to enjoy the book as much as those readers who have some knowledge of the originals. Younger readers, gore hounds, those who prefer a faster pace, or those who enjoy modern horror may think this type of stuff is a bit old hat. It’s not, and it really grows on you if you feel your way into the stories and atmosphere, so give it a chance. The Victorian era was a pivotal period in the development of horror fiction and William Meikle gives it the respect it deserves. If you’re a student of horror and its origins, you should do the same.

The narrator links the stories together with the concept that all the real authors hung out and met over drinks to scare each other with ghost stories in a club founded by Bram Stoker and Arthur Conan Doyle. This pastime, which was very popular in the Victorian and Edwardian period, gave birth to countless classic stories told round roaring fires. Meikle says in a brief interview on Amazon UK: “I love the idea that all these famous writers knew each other, and met for a meal, a drink, a smoke and some storytelling in an old London club / bar setting. It chimes almost exactly with my own idea of a good time.” I’m not sure if they all did know each other, but many of them certainly did. Readers will also enjoy the banter between the authors, even those who couldn’t make it (Tolstoy) because of a detour in Siberia.

To call The Ghost Club: Newly Found Tales of Victorian Terror a pastiche of Victorian supernatural fiction really does not do it justice. Meikle playfully manipulates multiple styles, has sly references to real stories and has created a work which comes across as genuinely authentic. Hopefully it will entice readers back to a key period in the development of the horror story of which Meikle is obviously both very knowledgeable and a fan of. Pour yourself a drink and dive in.